Sessions

2021 Dec 06

Now What? Whither Goes Electricity Policy?

1:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Session

A confluence of events presents major implications for the development of electricity system policy as part of the larger energy transition.  The 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties in Glasgow, Federal legislation for the economy and climate policy, increasing focus on upgrading the transmission grid to achieve national goals, and responses to extreme events such as in Texas (ERCOT) could set dramatically new paths for the evolution of the electricity system.   There is general agreement that much is broken and needs to be fixed, but less of a common view of...

Read more about Now What? Whither Goes Electricity Policy?
2021 Mar 09

Clean Energy Policy: Ends, Means, and Playing Fields

12:00pm to 3:00pm

Location: 

Virtual Session

The level playing field metaphor has long been a mantra of electricity market reform and regulation. The goal was an efficient and reliable system that supported investment. The costly experience with failures of monopoly planning pointed to using markets to help achieve the benefits of competition. Although always a work in progress, the policy had a coherent framework of balancing costs and benefits. Has clean energy policy upset this coherent framework? Does the science of climate change dictate clean...

Read more about Clean Energy Policy: Ends, Means, and Playing Fields
2021 Sep 28

Tail events: Prediction, Planning, and Performance

1:30pm to 4:30pm

Location: 

Virtual Session

Tail events: Prediction, Planning, and Performance

Extreme weather and related fires and floods are much in the news.  The electricity crisis in ERCOT in February 2021 illustrated the challenge of addressing high consequence but low probability events.  The extraordinary heat wave on the Pacific Coast of US and Canada in June provided a stark example of a seemingly very low probability event that was not predicted and shocked us because of the magnitude of the temperature spike.  How much of this is driven by climate change dynamics? If so, what reliability/resiliency policy implications should that have? And how much remains both surprising and unexplained?  Everyone wants to protect against severe consequences.  A report on the ERCOT crisis by former state regulators in Texas embraced the title “Never Again”.  But we cannot protect ourselves from everything.  When we get outside the envelope, emergency procedures are required.  How have these cases changed the analysis, prediction, planning and procedures for low probability high consequence events?  What promises should we make? What promises can we keep?

... Read more about Tail events: Prediction, Planning, and Performance

2019 Oct 01

96th Plenary Session

(All day)

Location: 

MANDARIN ORIENTAL HOTEL-WASHINGTON, D.C.

Session One - Decline in Revenues: Impact on Generators and Utilities and Options for Response

Dan Dolan, New England Power Generators Association

Mason Emnett, Exelon Corporation

Rob Gramlich, Grid Strategies

David Springe, National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates

Session Two - California Electricity Crisis (2000-2001): Legacy and Lessons

William Hogan, Harvard Kennedy School

... Read more about 96th Plenary Session
2019 Mar 26

94th Plenary Session

11:55am

Location: 

Ritz Carlton Half Moon Bay Half Moon Bay, California

Session One. Competition in Transmission: Policy Direction and Experience Since Order 1000

Judy Chang, The Brattle Group

Jennifer Curran, Midcontinent ISO

Nina Plaushin, ITC

Sharon Segner, LS Power

 

Session Two. Gas and Electric Coordination: Evolution or Revolution?

Robert Ethier, ISO New England

Jonathan Peress, Environmental Defense Fund

...

Read more about 94th Plenary Session
2019 Dec 13

97th Plenary Session

(All day)

Location: 

Marana, AZ

Session One-Forming Expectations for Price Formation

Beth Garza, Potomac Economics

Michael Hogan, Regulatory Assistance Project

Travis Kavulla, NRG Energy

Mark Rothleder, California ISO

Session Two-Coherence or Confusion: What is the Environmental Agenda for the Power Sector?

Peter Behr, Energywire

Ben Hobbs, Johns Hopkins University

John Moore,...

Read more about 97th Plenary Session
2020 May 28

The EPA Mercury Rule: State of the Cost-Benefit Debate; Are Generators Collateral Damage?

(All day)

Location: 

HEPG

The Environmental Protection Agency recently “completed a reconsideration of the appropriate and necessary finding for the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards.”  The main elements of the finding address the appropriate metrics for the underlying cost-benefit analysis.   The focus was on whether to include co-benefits in determining what is required to meet the “appropriate and necessary” standard to be applied to its rules under the Clean Air Act. In doing so, EPA left the pre-existing mercury rule in place but removed its factual and analytical underpinning....

Read more about The EPA Mercury Rule: State of the Cost-Benefit Debate; Are Generators Collateral Damage?
2020 Jun 22

Looking Ahead: Price Formation and Multi-Period Dispatch - June 22, 2020

(All day)

Location: 

HEPG

The basic model of bid-based, security-constrained, economic dispatch with locational prices is well understood and provides the foundation for efficient pricing. The most common analysis is for a single period with well-behaved bids and offers without uncertainty. With independent dispatches, serial application of this approach produces efficient prices. The real dispatch system requires some degree of look-ahead with intertemporal constraints. The expansion of intermittent resources increases the importance of efficient multi-period pricing. In principle, the same model applies for the...

Read more about Looking Ahead: Price Formation and Multi-Period Dispatch - June 22, 2020
2020 Oct 20

Markets Abroad: Learning by Looking

(All day)

Many of the fundamental characteristics of power systems are the same across countries.  Even so, the differences in polices and market designs can be striking.  Although there has been some convergence, the transformations to create electricity markets followed different paths.  Looming challenges have produced similar issues to deal with growing deployment of clean energy.  How can we balance the use of markets and mandates to ensure resource adequacy?  What are the workable methods for grid expansion and integration across national...

Read more about Markets Abroad: Learning by Looking
2020 Oct 27

Dispatching Demand: A Critical Element of Future Electricity Systems

(All day)

Location: 

HEPG

Technological progress and public policy pressures are accelerating decarbonization of electricity supply. Increasingly, states and utilities are announcing 100% renewable, 100% clean or net zero carbon targets and mandates. With intermittent sources as the dominant source of supply, there is concern about the loss of system flexibility. Hence, activating flexible demand could well be key to managing future electricity systems cost-effectively. Flexible demand tends to occur at the distribution level. This in turn creates at least two issues: First, how can load flexibility be...

Read more about Dispatching Demand: A Critical Element of Future Electricity Systems
2021 Feb 03

Clean Energy Policy: Tools and Trajectories

(All day)

Location: 

Virtual Session
The goal of clean or at least net emission free energy systems by a certain date dominates discussion of the policy agenda. The question of feasibility of such an objective, at least for the electricity sector, can be answered easily as a purely technological matter. It is possible. The challenges will include both costs and systemic inertia. The interesting questions have to do with the relative merits of different tools and trajectories. How fast would the transformation occur? What would be deployment of existing technologies versus reliance on research to identify and develop new... Read more about Clean Energy Policy: Tools and Trajectories
2021 Apr 20

Order 2000 Revisited - FERC Market Expansion and RTO Policy: Where are we now?

(All day)

Location: 

Virtual Session
Order 2000 by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission set the regulatory foundation of today’s organized electricity markets. While policies of wholesale competition drove early interests in markets, the growth of intermittent and potential entrance of distributed resources and associated policy changes are driving market interest in further wholesale market development. Do these changes offer greater incentives to utilities to join RTO’s and/or provide the FERC with greater authority to further incentivize or even compel RTO membership?   While PJM, MISO and SPP saw... Read more about Order 2000 Revisited - FERC Market Expansion and RTO Policy: Where are we now?
2021 Jun 08

Stranded Assets: This Time is Different 

(All day)

Location: 

Virtual Session

 

Reinhart and Rogoff subtitled This Time is Different to describe “Eight Centuries of Financial Folly” and the durability of hope over experience.  Material changes in relative market economics for long-lived assets create the problem of  stranded assets.  Wise investors look ahead to avoid or insure against such losses, but sophisticated investors have been surprised in the past.  For energy, the regulatory compact implies symmetry under cost-based regulation, but the record presents a history of prominent...

Read more about Stranded Assets: This Time is Different 

Pages