Publications

2016
Anders, Dave. “PJM Stakeholder Process".” In, 2016.Abstract
Anders, Dave. PJM Stakeholder Process." Presentation to the Harvard Electricity Policy Group's 82nd Plenary Session. Washington, DC, March 10, 2016."
anders_presentation.pdf
Nelson, Jeffrey. “The Stakeholder Experience: The California ISO.” In, 2016.Abstract
Nelson, Jeffrey. The Stakeholder Experience: The California ISO." Presentation to the Harvard Electricity Policy Group's 82nd Plenary Session. Washington, DC, March 10, 2016."
nelson_presentation.pdf
Wilson, Elizabeth. “Stakeholder Processes.” In, 2016.Abstract
Wilson, Elizabeth. Stakeholder Processes." Presentation to the Harvard Electricity Policy Group's 82nd Plenary Session. Washington, DC, March 10, 2016."
wilson_presentation.pdf
Bleiweis, Bruce. “US ISO Governance: Summary & Observations".” In, 2016.Abstract
Bleiweis, Bruce. US ISO Governance: Summary & Observations." Presentation to the Harvard Electricity Policy Group's 82nd Plenary Session. Washington, DC, March 10, 2016."
bleiweispresentation.pdf
Ramey, Todd. “Value of Flexibility in MISO Dispatch and Pricing.” In, 2016.Abstract
Ramey, Todd. Value of Flexibility in MISO Dispatch and Pricing." Presentation to the Harvard Electricity Policy Group's 82nd Plenary Session. Washington, DC, March 10, 2016."
ramey_presentation.pdf
The Value of Transmission.” In, 2016.Abstract
Southwest Power Pool. The Value of Transmission." January 2016."
the_value_of_transmission_report.pdf
2015
Weiss, Jurgen. “ The EPA Clean Power Plan: What Now?” 2015. panel_3_weiss.pdf
Scherman, Bill, and Gibson Dunn. “The EPA Clean Power Plan: What Now?-Scherman and Dunn.” In, 2015. panel_3_scherman.pdf
Weiss, Jurgen, and Eleanor Denny. “Hurry or Wait: The Pros and Cons of Going Fast or Slow on Climate Change.” Economists' Voice 12, no. 1 (2015): 19-24. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Climate change risk will likely force the de-carbonization of our electricity sector and thus involve massive investments in long-lived assets using many new and emerging technologies. Since technological progress (independent or dependent on deployment) will likely lower the future cost of those technologies, investing early and rapidly forecloses saving money by installing those technologies at a lower cost later. There are thus benefits to waiting until the costs of renewables fall further. However, there are also costs to waiting. First, given the longevity of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, cumulative emissions matter and lowering greenhouse gas emissions earlier is beneficial. Second, there is significant uncertainty not only over the rate of change of the cost of low carbon technologies, but also over the cost of greenhouse gas emissions. The costs of waiting are complex in that the distributions themselves are unknown (and quite possibly have “fat” tails). There may also be complex timing issues such as points of no return in terms of global greenhouse gas concentrations, beyond which the costs of adapting to climate change effects become essentially infinite. Hurrying can therefore be considered an insurance policy against the unknown but perhaps increasing risk of catastrophic damage.
Brown, Ashley. “Value of Value of Solar: Just a Trip Down Memory Lane? A Bit of 1980’s Retro.” In, 2015. panel_2_brown.pdf
Rossi, Jim. “The Federal Power Act's Federalism(s).” In, 2015. rossi_panel_3.pdf
O'Neill, Richard. “Computational Challenges in Electricity Markets.” In, 2015.Abstract
O'Neill, Richard. Computational Challenges in Electricity Markets." Presentation to the Harvard Electricity Policy Group's 80th Plenary Session, Houston, TX, October 2015."
panel_1_oneill.pdf
Caramanis, Michael. “Computational Frontiers in Electricity Markets: Not Your Grandfather's Economic Dispatch.""” In, 2015.Abstract
Caramanis, Michael. Computational Frontiers in Electricity Markets: Not Your Grandfather's Economic Dispatch."Presentation to the Harvard Electricity Policy Group's 80th Plenary Session, Houston, TX, October 2015."
panel_1_m_caramanis.pdf
The Integrated Grid: A Benefit-Cost Framework Executive Summary.” In, 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Electric Power Research Institute. The Integrated Grid: A Benefit-Cost Framework Executive Summary." Palo Alto, CA, Febrary 2015."
The Integrated Grid: A Benefit-Cost Framework Final Report.” In, 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Electric Power Research Institute. The Integrated Grid: A Benefit-Cost Framework Final Report." Palo Alto, CA, February 2015."
The Integrated Grid: A Benefit-Cost Framework Overview.” In, 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Electric Power Research Institute. The Integrated Grid: A Benefit-Cost Framework Overview." Palo Alto,CA, January 2015."
The Integrated Grid: A Benefit-Cost Framework Pilots.” In, 2015. Publisher's VersionAbstract
Electric Power Research Institute. The Integrated Grid: A Benefit-Cost Framework Pilots." Palo Alto, CA, January 2015."
De Martini, Paul. “Making the Distribution Grid More Open, Efficient and Resilient.” In, 2015.Abstract
De Martini, Paul. Making the Distribution Grid More Open, Efficient and Resilient." Presentation to the Harvard Electricity Policy Group 78th Plenary Session, Half Moon Bay, CA, March 2015."
2_demartini.pdf
Bixby, Robert. “Mixed Integer Programming: The State of the Art.” In, 2015.Abstract
Bixby, Robert. Mixed Integer Programming: The State of the Art." Presentation to the Harvard Electricity Policy Group's 80th Plenary Session, Houston, TX, October 2015
panel_1_r_bixby.pdf
Neenan, Bernie. “Planning and Operating an Integrated Grid.” In, 2015.Abstract
Neenan, Bernie. Planning and Operating an Integrated Grid." Presentation to the Harvard Electricity Policy Group 78th Plenary Session, Half Moon Bay, CA, March 2015."
2_neenan.pdf

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